At the tips of their tongues: interior design pros share trends and tips for 2018

by Neal Kielar, Tastemaker in Residence

 Echos of the past inform the colors and styles of 2018, according to St. Paul, MN-based interior designer Susan E. Brown.

Echos of the past inform the colors and styles of 2018, according to St. Paul, MN-based interior designer Susan E. Brown.

Just like fashion, interior design is influenced by trends - some of them organic and others contrived. But who doesn't like to be "on trend" in their style, even just a little? I invited a few of my go-to interior design professionals to share their thoughts on what's trending in 2018. While each of them has their own take, it was revealing to see "authenticity" as a common thread.

SUSAN E. BROWN

Looking forward into 2018 I'm seeing the colors and styles of the past – the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s – continuing to trend. The palette, in which gold, green, teal and mauve dominate, is tweaked and freshened with colors that are less saturated. The result is a warmer, earthier appearance. These color trends are appearing in fabric and wallpaper, too, with floral and geometric patterns that are less exact and stylized than before. The overall feel is more artisan and handmade.

AUTUMN MULDOWNEY
Muldowney Interiors, LLC

Overall, I've been really digging design that is much more personal and curated to reflect our individual personalities. For example, I'm loving lighter weight natural fiber sheer fabrics for draperies, all things macrame, very simply framed original art or special "poster art" that carries a personal meaning. The trend toward things that are locally produced, made by hand and tell a story is still strong.  Vintage items and things that have been artfully crafted make me feel good and make my home and my clients' homes feel more intimate and less staged.

EMILY CARLSON
Righteous Digs

One trend I love is mixing your metallics. It breaks conventional design rules to have brass, stainless, and copper all in one space. When done with purpose, though, it can bring a dynamic contrast to the design. I'm guiding my clients to use nostalgia – personal experiences and meaning – as a primary way to define their surroundings. Building a design around deeper personal connections will resonate stronger and longer than just choosing beautiful items based solely on their visual appeal.